Traci T. McKee

As a product liability litigator, Traci McKee defends medical devices and pharmaceutical products that save lives and consumer products that enhance lives. She represents product manufacturers in complex, high stakes litigation such as mass torts and class actions, as well as single-plaintiff claims. With more than a decade of litigation practice, Traci has substantial experience in all phases of litigation from discovery through trial, having served as first chair and second chair in multiple jury trials. She understands the strategies and goals of the clients she represents and develops tailored litigation strategies focused on each client’s business goals.

View the full bio for Traci T. McKee at the Faegre Drinker website.

Articles by Traci T. McKee:


Can a Person Marry Into Consortium Damages in a Wrongful Death Claim? Florida’s Fourth and Fifth District Courts of Appeal Are in Conflict

Share

As things stand, a spouse who marries a decedent post-injury cannot recover wrongful death damages in the Fourth District but can recover such damages in the Fifth District. All eyes are on the Florida Supreme Court to resolve the confusion, contradiction and uncertainty facing some Florida litigants related to wrongful death claims.

Continue reading “Can a Person Marry Into Consortium Damages in a Wrongful Death Claim? Florida’s Fourth and Fifth District Courts of Appeal Are in Conflict”

Improper Texting During Remote Testimony Can Result in Significant Consequences to Litigants and Lawyers

Share

For many litigators, sworn testimony today looks much different than it did two years ago. As the COVID-19 pandemic has required parties to limit travel and in-person proceedings, remote testimony for depositions, arbitrations and even trials has become the rule rather than the exception. With this transition, litigators have been confronted with unique circumstances and felt compelled to ask questions to confirm that the witness’s testimony is that of the witness, and only the witness. For example, is anyone else present in the room with the witness? Does the witness have any unauthorized lines of communication that could be used while the sworn testimony is proceeding? It has now become critical to ask a witness to swear under oath that there is no one else in the room with the witness and that no person is authorized to communicate with the witness during her or his testimony. Several recent decisions solidify this practice point and illustrate the consequences to litigants and lawyers when a witness surreptitiously communicates with others during the course of remote testimony.

Continue reading “Improper Texting During Remote Testimony Can Result in Significant Consequences to Litigants and Lawyers”

Florida Rule Change Permits Immediate Appeals on Punitive Damages

Share

The Florida Supreme Court has accepted a proposed rule amendment to permit interlocutory appeals of court orders on punitive damages claims. On January 6, 2022, the Florida Supreme Court approved by 6-1 an amendment to Florida Rule of Appellate Procedure 9.130 to allow interlocutory appeals of nonfinal orders granting or denying leave to amend a complaint to assert a claim for punitive damages. Prior to this amendment, a party could only appeal such an order by petitioning for a writ of certiorari. And in that posture, the appellate court’s review was limited only to whether the trial court complied with the procedural requirements for making such a claim.

Practically, this means Florida appellate courts will be able to immediately review trial court orders regarding punitive damages claims on both procedural and substantive grounds. With this amendment, the merits of a plaintiff’s punitive damages claim can now be appealed prior to any discovery of a defendant’s financial information. The new rule takes effect April 1, 2022.

Continue reading “Florida Rule Change Permits Immediate Appeals on Punitive Damages”

Florida Appellate Court Authorizes the Use of the Risk-Utility Test in Complex Medical Device Cases

Share

On October 7, 2020, Florida’s Fourth District Court of Appeal affirmed a defense verdict in favor of a medical device manufacturer and in doing so approved of the trial court’s use of the risk-utility test and not the consumer expectations test in the jury instructions. Cavanaugh v. Stryker Corp., — So. 2d —, 2020 WL 5937405 (Fla. 4th DCA Oct. 7, 2020). The wrongful death lawsuit was filed against multiple defendants, including the manufacturer of a medical device used to remove blood and clear the surgical field, following the death of a patient during lung removal surgery. The claims against the medical device manufacturer included strict liability design defect, strict liability failure to warn, and negligence.

The plaintiff settled with several health care professionals and only the claims against the manufacturer proceeded to trial. At trial, the plaintiff proposed a jury instruction where the jury could find that the product was unreasonably dangerous if the plaintiff established either the consumer expectations test (which determines liability based on whether the product fails to perform as safely as an ordinary consumer would expect when used as intended or when used in a manner reasonably foreseeable by the manufacturer) or the risk-utility test (which determines liability based on whether the risk of danger in the design outweighs the benefit). The defendant manufacturer, however, proposed that the jury instruction include only the risk-utility test (a product is unreasonably dangerous if the risk of danger in the design outweighs the benefit). The trial court rejected the plaintiff’s proposed instruction and adopted the defendant’s risk-utility instruction.

Continue reading “Florida Appellate Court Authorizes the Use of the Risk-Utility Test in Complex Medical Device Cases”